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Dialogue and learning for creating a peaceful, sustainable world.


 

 

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The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus
In-depth critical analysis of the forces shaping the Asia-Pacific...and the world.

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The Delicate Matter of Peace and the Nobel Peace Prize
Dec. 05, 2010 - Dec. 12, 2010

 

Richard Falk, professor emeritus of international law at Princeton University and in 2008 appointed United Nations Special Rapporteur on Palestinian human rights, comments at his new blog on the "delicate matter" of awarding the Nobel Peace Prize to those who have done little to promote the kind of peace envisioned by Sir Alfred Nobel back in 1895 (the first peace prize was awarded in 1901). Professor Falk discusses 2009 peace prize winner Barack Obama and the 2010 winner, Chinese political and human rights activist Liu Xiaobo. (Related: "Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony" from the week of November 7). The 2010 Nobel Peace Prize will be awarded on December 10. [via Citizen Pilgrimage]

 

Update: Also check out "Darkest hour is before dawn of leviathan's final fall," an edited interview with Pu Zhiqiang, a Chinese human rights lawyer, in the Dec. 10 Sydney Morning Herald.

 

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