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The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus
In-depth critical analysis of the forces shaping the Asia-Pacific...and the world.

 

From November 10 we launch our annual fundraising campaign to keep the Journal a vibrant and free voice exploring the Asia-Pacific and the world. Fulfilling our goal of $12,000 will allow us to do so, and to move ahead with a redesigned home page that will make our work more accessible and professional and to host a series of special issues in formation. If you wish to support the journal and assure our ability to make it available free to readers around the world, please go to our sustainer's page on the home page and contribute via Paypal or credit card. We are a 501 (c) tax exempt organization, meaning that your contribution is fully tax deductible.
Terese Svoboda

Terese Svoboda is the author of ten books of prose and poetry, most recently the memoir Black Glasses Like Clark Kent: A GIs Secret from Postwar Japan, winner of the 2007 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize. Its website is http://blackglasseslikeclarkkent.com/. Her second novel, A Drink Called Paradise, concerns the effects of US atomic tests in the Pacific islands.

A native of Ogallala, Nebraska, writer Terese Svoboda studied at Manhattan College, Stanford University, Oxford University, the University of Colorado, the University of Nebraska — Lincoln, and Montreal University of Fine Arts. She graduated from the University of British Columbia and Columbia University, where she received her MA. She lived for a year in the Sudan, making documentary films and translating the songs of the Nuer people. Her novel, Cannibal, won the Bobst Prize and the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writer's Award and was chosen as one of the top ten books of the year by Spin magazine and hailed as a "women's 'Heart of Darkness'" by Vogue. Her story "Party Girl" was a finalist in the 1995 Mississippi Review Prize competition. A book of nonfiction, Black Glasses Like Clark Kent won the 2007 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize and will be published by Graywolf. Her poetry and fiction have appeared in Antioch Review, APR, Columbia, Conjunctions, Georgetown Review, Harper's, Paris Review, The New Yorker, Noon, Ohio Review, Vogue, and The Wall Street Journal. Her novel Other books include Treason (Zoo Press, 2002), A Drink Called Paradise (Counterpoint Press), and Trailer Girl and Other Stories. Her memoir, Black Glasses Like Clark Kent, won the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize for 2007. Her poetry videos have been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art and on PBS. She has taught at Sarah Lawrence College, The New School, the University of Hawaii, Williams College, San Francisco State University, and the College of William and Mary. She lives with her husband and children in New York City's Chinatown.

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