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The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus
In-depth critical analysis of the forces shaping the Asia-Pacific...and the world.

 

From November 10 we launch our annual fundraising campaign to keep the Journal a vibrant and free voice exploring the Asia-Pacific and the world. Fulfilling our goal of $12,000 will allow us to do so, and to move ahead with a redesigned home page that will make our work more accessible and professional and to host a series of special issues in formation. If you wish to support the journal and assure our ability to make it available free to readers around the world, please go to our sustainer's page on the home page and contribute via Paypal or credit card. We are a 501 (c) tax exempt organization, meaning that your contribution is fully tax deductible.
Karen Thornber

Karen Thornber is Harris K. Weston Associate Professor of the Humanities in the Department of Comparative Literature at Harvard University.  Having earned her Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard in 2006, she is the author of Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature (Harvard 2009), which won both the Association for Asian Studies John Whitney Hall Book Prize (2011) for the best English-language book on Japan and the International Comparative Literature Association Anna Balakian Book Prize (2010) for the best book in the field of Comparative Literature in the last three years by a scholar under age forty. Ecoambiguity: Environmental Crises and East Asian Literatures (Michigan 2012) is her second book.  Her translation of the atomic-bomb writer Tōge Sankichi’s Genbaku shishū (Poems of the Atomic Bomb, 1952), published as an e-book by the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies, won the 2012 William F. Sibley Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature and Literary Studies.  She is currently studying Hindi and Urdu for her current book project, Global Health and World Literature: East Asia and the Indian Ocean Rim.

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